Mexico’s positive Tourism Dept. changes

In a piece featured with CNN a few days ago, a number of positive measures are mentioned with regards to what Mexico is doing to help its ailing tourism industry.

  1. Mexico has begun allowing holders of U.S. visas to enter Mexico, opening up the possibility of tourists to the United States extending their trips south of the border.
  2. Brazilians, Russians and Ukrainian visitors can gain travel permission to Mexico on the Internet, with no need for a visa. (In 2011 to date, Mexico has seen a 40.9% increase in Brazilian tourists, a 58.1% increase from Russia and 32.8% increase from China, according to Mexico’s tourism ministry.)
  3. Finally, for travelers from other countries, visas to Mexico in many cases can be obtained through a travel agent, erasing the need for trips to embassies.

These are important changes that should make it easier for people to travel to Mexico. Point #1 is an excellent move, as it allows for people that are planning to visit the U.S. to now, with no additional paperwork, visit Mexico at the same time. And point #3, that visas can now be obtained through a travel agent and not have to visit an embassy, is also a great idea. But will it be enough?

Mexico has to look at other markets, especially over the next few years while the U.S. economy is on the road to recovery, and allow Americans time to really see the reports on violence in Mexico for what they really are: it’s taking place in very specific places, which in most cases are far from the popular tourist regions, and its being sensationalized. At some point Americans will begin to understand that millions of Americans visit Mexico every year without ever experiencing problems and actually have a very good time.

But until then, Mexico has to look elsewhere, just like U.S. investors are looking elsewhere, at emerging markets. The U.S. and Europe are going to be tied down with debt problems, both sovereign and public, along with high unemployment, for some time to come. Public debt and unemployment are going to make it hard for Americans to travel, while people in emerging markets are not experiencing similar issues. They are not plagued by high debt and unemployment. Investors are looking at foreign emerging markets for better returns, it looks like Mexico is as well for their tourist industry.

For U.S. travelers specifically, the Commerce Department’s most recent data — for 2009 — shows that 31.7% of all U.S. international tourists go to Mexico. From 2002 to 2009, while U.S. tourism to Canada fell by more than 27%, tourism to Mexico from the U.S. increased by 5.1%. This happened even though the overall number of Americans traveling abroad decreased, from a peak of 64 million in 2007 to 61.4 million in 2009.

These are impressive numbers, and coming from the U.S. department of commerce, not Mexico’s: 1 in 3 American international tourists in 2009 went to Mexico.

However, although these new markets may provide tourists, they most likely will not be providing people or families that may be interested in real estate. Mexico’s strongest target markets for real estate sales remains in the U.S. and Canada, where travel to somewhere warm is for most people, only 3-4 hours away. For the local real estate market to make a serious bounce back, it needs Americans buying second homes once again. With real estate values still falling in the U.S., it seems this is still a ways away. Although the local market seems to be holding its own, its a long ways from the boom years from 2003 to 2008.

 

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